Clinical Trials


Newly blended collaborations on the integrative health landscape:

  • MD Anderson: $4.5 mm for study of Yoga and Cancer
  • Greenwhich (CT) Hospital: Healing Touch brings faster recuperation
  • Review of 14-years of research shows benefits of Qigong and Tai Chi

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National Cancer Institute Funds 20,000-person Trial in Early 2010

In a recently released video NCI’s Dr. John Milner, chief of the Division of Cancer Prevention’s Nutritional Science Research Group, describes how changing scientific perceptions of the medicinal power of foods and the knowledge of the human genome is influencing cancer research.

Citing “rather compelling evidence” that shows “30% of cancers are related to dietary habits,” Milner observed that in cancer-averting diets, “You must assume that those foods are supplying some bioactive food component.”

“It is an area that somehow we have thought is very simple,” he notes.  “But is not very simple.” (more…)

On Nov. 9  I had the opportunity to participate in a symposium that had the feeling of a seminal moment for the integrative health community. The “Complementary and Integrative Medicine (CIM) Stakeholder Symposium” held in Baltimore focused on changes now underway that may well redefine how evidence is defined in medical research. The trend has evolved over the last decade, independently of the growth of integrative practice. It has come about largely because of dissatisfaction with the results of narrowly constructed but long accepted traditional research methodologies (i.e., random controlled trials).

As a result, in the next two years, the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) will be channeling $800 million into a formal program for Comparative Effectiveness Research.

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And Its Confluence with Integrative Medicine, Outcomes and the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act

SM_logosIn the last 24 months, the rapid of adoption of social media elements by organizations of all kinds has started to gather up hospitals, where Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and flickr are becoming the engagement tools of choice.

Apart from reaching hospitals via those social media paragons, consumers have long been using web-based online support groups or patient communities, some designed for mutual support (“Pregnancy & Parenting Support”), others organized around research or clinical trials (“The Children’s Inn at NIH”), all of them completely patient-centric.

The rationale for these actions is by now simple to understand: the number of people using social media sites is huge and growing. The children of Baby (more…)